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Amanda Waters

Searching for Kingsley Family Information

Research Notes from Jett Hanna; March, 2014: 
Long time since I did anything on genealogy, but I finally went down to New Braunfels to see what else I could find on Amanda Waters and the Kingsleys she lived with. I did find an 1870 deed to Alpha Kingsley when he bought 67.5 acres of land on the Guadalupe about 15 miles up river from New Braunfels, probably is under Canyon Lake now. I did not find where he sold the property, which is odd. I found no probate record on him, no marriage record for him and Sarah Kingsley. I do think I may have found him in the 1860 census, in Kansas Territory, Araphoe County at South Park. Learned some history:  Araphoe County was incorporated into Colorado Territory after Kansas became a state shortly after the 1860 census. South Park is a mining town not to far from Pikes Peak, where there was a gold rush that began in 1858. A. Kinglsey of about the right age is there, but no birth places on his page for some reason. There is a slightly older E. M. Kingsley from Missouri, which would match Alfred. There were almost no women in the census pages I looked at for South Park, just men with the occupation "miner" (except for one marked "saloon." Sounds like a wild place. Before the 1860 census, I'm still at a loss finding the Kingsley family. Amanda says her father was born in Illinois, her mother in Louisiana in 1900 and 1920 censuses. The 1870 census says Sarah Kingsley was born in Missouri, like Alfred. But as some of Amanda's other census entries show, they didn't always get that right for everyone.  My next step would be to see if I can find out when Alfred (also called Alpha in many places including the deed) lost the Comal County property. It was not in the indexes, and there was no probate. That means that (1) I missed it; (2) he died without a will and it passed to someone that way; or (3) a court case transferred the property. I'll get back down there sometime and check that out, hopefully with the help of a title company.  I want to figure out when he left or died, hoping that Sarah pops up again somehow. I discovered a very interesting family tree and additional information about Alpha on Ancestry.com. Based on this tree, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/17158024/person/495839714?ssrc=  Alpha and Mary Ellen (the 14 year old in the 1870 census) had a child in 1872 in Comal County. (!) Alpha and Sarah are said to have married "about 1862" Neither event is documented, however.  Alpha received a land grant in Arkansas in 1883, so he probably came to the state around that time.  It looks like Alpha/Alfred married the 14 year old from the 1870 census in 1887 in Arkansas, which is weird, to say the least. Some family trees seem to indicate that Alfred/Alpha and Ellen were in Oklahoma by 1880 and had kids during the 80s there, before the 1887 marriage date. There are no census records for Oklahoma at that time-it was Indian Territory. And on top of that, not many non-Indians. The land rush did not start until 1889; my great grandmother and great grandfather on the other side of the tree participated in one about the mid 1890s-the Kickapoo Run. Why would a white family (a presumption, I guess) be in Indian Territory at that time???  Alpha may have some interesting history of his own...he is referred to as a Dr. in one family tree.  Too bad he isn't a direct ancestor...or is he??? No 1890 census in Arkansas, the big burned census, so no Kingsley then. Many trees say Alpha/Alfred died in 1885, but that's not possible with the 1887 marriage to Mary Ellen, I don't think.:) I found others who say 1889 for his death. In any event, if accurate, we would not expect to find him in later Arkansas census records, and I didn't. So...does this help us with Amanda? Not a lot, but at least we may be able to bracket how long Alpha was in Comal County and maybe figure out when they first got there, and from where At some point, I think it is worth pulling all of the Waters and Watters census records for 1860 in Texas and scouring them for people who might be Sarah, Ellen and Amanda. I've done that once, but not systematically with an eye toward mistakes as to age and names.

Owner/SourceJett Hanna
DateMar 2014
Linked toAmanda Waters (Census)

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